Who is Jesus?

It’s a question people have been wrestling with for 2,000 years with an answer that has the power to change your life forever. Through this study of the Gospel of Mark, we’ll examine who Jesus is and what that means for us today. We’ll see Him teaching, performing miracles, and interacting with others. Our hope is that, by the end of this journey, you’ll see Jesus for all that He is, the one and only Son of God who gave His life to save us forever and give us purpose and peace today!

Discover why it was said of Him, “We have never seen anything like this” . . .


THE GOSPEL OF MARK: WEEKLY READING

PART ONE: WHO IS JESUS?

FEB 6–7 | MARK 1:1–20

FEB 13-14 | MARK 1:21–45

FEB 20–21 | Mark 2:1-17

FEB 27–28 | Mark 2:18-3:6

MAR 6–7 | Mark 3:7-35

MAR 13–14 | Mark 4:1-34

MAR 20–21 | Mark 4:35-5:20


MAR 27–28 | Mark 5:21-43

APR 10-11 | Mark 6:1-29

APR 17-18 | Mark 6:30-53

APR 25-26 | Mark 7:1-37

MAY 1-2 | Mark 8:1-21

MAY 22-23 | Mark 8:22-38


PART TWO: JESUS CHANGES EVERYTHING

MAY 29-30 | MARK 9:1–29

JUNE 5-6 | MARK 9:30–50

JUNE 12-13 | Mark 10:1-16


JUNE 26–27 | Mark 10:17-31

JULY 3-4 | Mark 10:32-45


PART THREE: JESUS GOES PUBLIC

JULY 10-11 | MARK 11:1–26

JULY 17-18 | MARK 11:27–12:17

JULY 24-25 | MARK 12:18–44

AUG 7-8 | MARK 13:1–37

AUG 14-15 | MARK 14:1–42

AUG 21-22 | MARK 14:43–72

AUG 28-29 | MARK 15:1–41

SEP 5-6 | MARK 15:42–16:20


THE GOSPELS

The word gospel is Anglo-Saxon, meaning "God's spell," or “good news.” It is the Anglo rendering of the Greek word euangelion, which means, "good news." In ancient Greek literature and language, it was a word used when one brings good tidings. In reference to the Bible, it specifically refers to “the glad tidings of the kingdom of God, and also of Jesus, the Messiah, the founder of this kingdom.” What are the four books of the Bible we call the Gospels? They are four accounts of the life, missions, ministry, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. These four narratives, which tell the same story from unique perspectives and for diverse audiences were written to share the good news of salvation that comes through Jesus. The Gospel of Mark is one of the four Gospels found in the New Testament.

KEY THEMES

Jesus, the Son of God

From the very beginning, this Gospel makes its intention clear: “The beginning of the good news about Jesus the Messiah, the Son of God” (Mark 1:1 NIV). The kingdom of God has come to the earth in the person of Jesus. Mark’s account reveals Jesus’ authority 1) as a teacher (1:21–22), 2) to forgive sins (2:5–12), and 3) over Sabbath (2:27–28), unclean spirits (3:20–27), creation (4:35–41, 6:45–52), the law (7:1–20), the temple (11:12–19, 27–33, 12:1–12), and the mystery of the kingdom (4:10–11).

Jesus, the Son of Man

Jesus did not shy away from getting His hands dirty. He wasn’t deterred by ritual defilement, physical contamination, the potential of contracting disease, or moral pollution. He sought and served all; He went to the lowest of low and raised them up. His loving touch, mighty power, and redemptive words displayed compassion, humility, and accessibility for all.

Jesus, the Messiah

Jesus’ suffering, rejection, death, and resurrection are the center point of all of history and the lynchpin in God’s plan of salvation for mankind. Mark revealed the disciples’ initial inability to recognize Jesus as Messiah.

Jesus, the Suffering Servant

Jesus spoke openly of His suffering and death and warned His disciples that they’d also face persecution because of His name.

Jesus, the Savior of All Who Believe

Jesus is the Savior of all who receive Him by faith. Mark’s Gospel focuses on Jesus’ ministry in Gentile regions, records Gentile confessions of faith (15:39), the sending of the first Gentile missionary (5:18–19), and calls the temple “a house of prayer for all nations” (11:17).

THE GOSPEL OF MARK: STUDY QUESTIONS

PART ONE: WHO IS JESUS?

FEB 6–7 | MARK’S JESUS STORY
Group Resource & Study Questions (Coming Soon)

FEB 13–14 | GOD IN SANDALS
Group Resource & Study Questions (Coming Soon)

FEB 20–21 | A DIFFERENT KIND OF DOCTOR
Group Resource & Study Questions (Coming Soon)

FEB 27–28 | THE GOD WHO CAN’T BE TRAPPED
Group Resource & Study Questions (Coming Soon)

MAR 6–7 | DRAFT KING
Group Resource & Study Questions (Coming Soon)


MAR 13–14 | THE STORYTELLER
Group Resource & Study Questions (Coming Soon)

MAR 20–21 | STILL IN THE STORM
Group Resource & Study Questions (Coming Soon)

MAR 27–28 | THE TALE OF TWO DAUGHTERS
Group Resource & Study Questions (Coming Soon)

APR 10–11 | GOD ON A MISSION
Group Resource & Study Questions (Coming Soon)

APR 17–18 | MIRACLE WORKER
Group Resource & Study Questions (Coming Soon)


APR 25–26 | THE GOD WHO SEES THE HEART
Group Resource & Study Questions (Coming Soon)

MAY 1–2 | MORE THAN ENOUGH
Group Resource & Study Questions (Coming Soon)

MAY 22–23| THE GOD WHO GIVES SIGHT
Group Resource & Study Questions (Coming Soon)

NEED-TO-KNOW INFO

The narrative we now call the Gospel of Mark was written by the John Mark most likely somewhere between A.D. 50 and 68, with many pinpointing 64 as the year it was written. Based on this date, it is likely that Mark was the earliest Gospel account that was written.

A Brief Overview

John Mark and his mother were among the earliest followers of Jesus (1 Peter 5:13). In fact, his home was used as a meeting place for the apostles and early disciples, as is noted in Acts 12:12. He was cousins with Barnabas and even travelled with Paul for a season. He then served with the apostle Peter as his secretary up until Peter’s death in Rome in 68 AD. Thus, Mark's Gospel is actually a record of what Peter said, saw, and taught.

Who Was Mark?

The Gospel of Mark was written while Peter and John Mark were in Rome working with Roman Christians, and this was the original audience of the letter. Whereas the Gospel of Matthew was clearly written to a Jewish audience (as evidenced by the notations of fulfilled Old Testament prophecy), Mark was penned primarily to a Roman audience.

Who Was the Original Audience?

Mark is a historical narrative describing Jesus' life, work, teaching, miracles, death, and resurrection with little background information. Starting with His baptism, it doesn’t record the events surrounding Jesus’ birth or early life at all or dive into deep theology. Think of Mark like a snap shot or a post card. It’s short, to the point, and powerful. It tells the simple story of Jesus and then ends with a challenge: “Whoever believes and is baptized will be saved, but whoever does not believe will be condemned” (Mark 16:16 NIV).

Style

Mark is a Gospel of action and reaction. Not interested in character or doctrinal development, more space is given to miracles in this Gospel than the others—18 of the 35 recorded miracles across the four Gospels are found in Mark. He also takes a lot of time to describe the reactions of people to Jesus. This 16-chapter account contains more than 20 references to people who were “amazed,” “astonished,” “puzzled,” or “hostile.”

Of Note

JESUS’ JOURNEY IN THE GOSPEL OF MARK

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES